Scholarships For “C” Students

March 1, 2012
Scholarships For "C" Students - Believe it Or Not, It's True! by Dr. Kuni Beasley In my three decades of advising students about scholarships and warning them about scholarship scams, one of my slogans was "There aren't a bunch of people sitting around wanting to write checks for "C" students." My latest research proves that […]

Scholarships For "C" Students - Believe it Or Not, It's True!
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

In my three decades of advising students about scholarships and warning them about scholarship scams, one of my slogans was "There aren't a bunch of people sitting around wanting to write checks for "C" students." My latest research proves that statement to be wrong! Indeed, there are colleges that offer scholarships to "C" students and scholarships to students with low College Board scores. Doesn't make sense, but it's true.

For more than three decades I have been emphasizing good grades, high class rank, and high SAT and ACT scores as the foundation to finding scholarships. Although I will continue to chant that litany, I will also share that there are colleges that actually offer scholarships to people who have a good, solid "C" average and very strong "average" SAT and ACT scores.

In a public forum such as this, I am reluctant to simply blurt out the names of these colleges, but I will give you links to the websites if you contact me. I'm in the college prep business and I don't want to make any colleges angry with me if I publicize this kind of information, so I'll present the particulars and keep the names to protect the innocent.

College A - a state college located in a southern state:

Graduated from (name of the state) public high school and achieved a 2.50 high school GPA or 19+ ACT composite or equivalent, or graduated from a private, home-school, or out-of-state high school or earned a GED and earned a 19+ ACT or equivalent.

Award Amounts: $5,000 for 4-year University; $2,500 for 2-year institution.

Let's understand this in perspective. A 2.50 is a middle "C" average which could mean the student made enough A's and B's to balance out some D's and F's. Or it could mean the student was a consistent "C" student who made a few B's to move halfway in the 2.0 - 3.0 scale.

Any way you interpret this, we are not looking at a scholar. But I am not going to judge because there are a lot of students who goofed off in high school, grew up, and did great in college. Indeed, I work with a lot of adults who dropped out of high school who returned to college and did very well. In fact, I helped one get a Harvard scholarship.

The ACT score is one point above 18, considered to be the "average" ACT score. So we have a 2.50 (slightly above average) GPA and a 19 (slightly above average) ACT score combined that will get the student a potential $5000 scholarship.

This is strange for me because I often work with students who have fair to mid-line GPAs, who are otherwise intelligent, just bored in school and didn't put a lot of effort in. I can usually help them jump their SAT or ACT scores and mitigate less than spectacular GPAs. This scholarship throws a pretty heavy wrench into my paradigm.

The kicker here is that to maintain the scholarship, the student must maintain a 2.50 average in college, take at least 15 hours each semester, and be continuously enrolled. Not a significant challenge. The scholarship continues until the student graduates, completes 130 hours, or 8 semesters.

This goes to prove that there are many secret, hidden scholarship opportunities out there. It just takes some digging. However, I also want to caution you that there are also many scholarship scammers out there, too, who will take your money and promise you your mailbox will be filled with checks. I've never seen that played out in my three decades of doing this work.

As always, in dealing with college funding, always deal with a professional. Make sure they have letters (either degrees or professional designations) behind their name and can give you actual names of people who received funding due to their efforts. (see the testimonials page, under 'What People Say' tab). If at any time you feel pressured into writing a check or giving them a credit card number, or if they say the offer is only good right then, run away!

Kuni Michael Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
There is a lot of little known information about getting money for college. If you want to know what college this is and get some free information on college prep and money for college, contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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