Financial darkness covers Valley of the Sun campuses

February 11, 2009
by J.D. Wyczalek They say that it is always darkest just before dawn. Well it just got a whole lot darker. Now, not only will it be more difficult to get into an Arizona state school it will also cost more. And for some families much much more. With the budget cuts the Arizona State […]

by J.D. Wyczalek

They say that it is always darkest just before dawn. Well it just got a whole lot darker.

Now, not only will it be more difficult to get into an Arizona state school it will also cost more. And for some families much much more.

With the budget cuts the Arizona State University system has suspended funding of the AIMS scholarship program. Parents who were counting on this money for their new college freshman may be in shock.

Many parents have asked me how this is going to affect their student. In these uncertain economic times it is guaranteed the bottom line is it will be more expensive to send your student to an Arizona state school.

It is of extreme importance to research colleges especially during this chaotic economic turmoil.

While state colleges in California, Arizona and Florida to name a few, have been hit hard, some private colleges are now looking more attractive. While endowment funds have been hit, some private colleges are weathering the storm better. 
In response to the budget cuts ASU is closing about four dozen academic programs, many on the Tempe campus, and scaling down administrative operations at its Polytechnic and West campuses, in response to state budget reductions, which have totaled $88 million. The social work program in Tucson will also be closed, and is also suspending funding of its AIMS scholarship program. Arizona State University says it is forced to enact an enrollment cap. The application deadline for next semester's freshman class will end March 1, five months early.
Northern Arizona University announced closure of its Social Research Center public-opinion research laboratory and its Center for High Altitude Training plus keeping more than 100 positions unfilled.

So what can parents do? Depending on what grade your student is would depend on the strategy. As a high school freshman, sophomore or junior add more colleges to your list, preferably 6 to 8, including private colleges. As a high school senior, compare award letters in the upcoming months and look for scholarships that your student has a high percentage chance of winning.

Examiner article

KTAR article

ArizonaRepublic article

Learn the truth about how to position your student for colleges to beg and plead your student to come to their school, register for a local workshop now.

Be Sociable, Share!
en.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   

Comments are closed.