Department of Education Seeks to Regulate Higher Education

October 26, 2010
Department of Education Seeks to Regulate Higher Education  October 25, 2010 William A. Estrada, Esq. Director of Federal Relations Melanie Palazzo Congressional Action Program Director A recently proposed regulation would give the federal Department of Education unprecedented authority over all colleges and universities—even private ones. The proposed regulation, entitled “Program Integrity Issues,” would create new […]

Department of Education Seeks to Regulate Higher Education

 October 25, 2010

William A. Estrada, Esq.
Director of Federal Relations

Melanie Palazzo
Congressional Action Program Director

A recently proposed regulation would give the federal Department of Education unprecedented authority over all colleges and universities—even private ones. The proposed regulation, entitled “Program Integrity Issues,” would create new accreditation rules for public and private colleges and universities. It would also allow the federal government to determine what constitutes a “credit hour,” and would require colleges and universities to submit to additional regulation and supervision by state and federal officials.

Before the proposal of this new 87-page regulation, colleges were accredited mostly by independent education councils. There has never been an attempt by the federal government to force states to regulate colleges and universities. Likewise, the federal government has never created a definition of a “credit hour.”

However, the proposed regulation will define terms for every college and university, and require individual states to create agencies that regulate colleges and universities. Every college or university will be required to have “a document issued by a state government agency or state entity that affirms and conveys the authority to the institution to operate educational programs beyond secondary education.”

HSLDA is very concerned that the U.S. Department of Education will use this regulation to control and regulate all higher education. Federal control over the very existence of colleges and universities has never been attempted before this regulation. Additionally, having a federal definition of “credit hour” could easily lead to future regulations that mandate what is taught in colleges and universities. Michael Farris, HSLDA chairman and founder of Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, stated, “The regulation that forces states to create new regulatory bureaucracies is blatantly unconstitutional.”

The final regulation will be issued on November 1, 2010.

Action Requested

We urge you to write or email your U.S. representative and senators and let them know your opinion on this rule. Since this proposed regulation will affect all students, not just homeschooled graduates, there is no need to identify yourself as a homeschooler.

You can include some or all of the following in your message. We encourage you to put this into your own words, and maybe share some of your personal experiences:

“I am very concerned about the U.S. Department of Education’s proposed rule that was published on Friday, June 18, 2010, regarding 34 CFR Parts 600, 602, et al., ‘Program Integrity Issues.’ This proposed rule will gives the federal government the power to force the states to create new regulatory bureaucracies to regulate colleges and universities. Additionally, the federal government will be empowered to define what constitutes a ‘credit hour,’ and to force colleges and universities to comply with additional regulations. This proposed rule applies even to private and religious colleges and universities.

I urge you to conduct an investigation into this proposed regulation and use all possible means to stop it from being implemented.”

Find the contact information for your elected officials >>

This article was originally published on http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/201010250.asp

J.D.'s Comments: With added regulations, added control will eventually come. Remember to VOTE!

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Suit claims antitrust law violations

October 25, 2010
Suit claims antitrust law violations The NCAA was sued in federal court Monday in a case that seeks to overturn the governing body's policy of putting one-year limits on athletic scholarships. The suit was filed in California on behalf of former Rice football player Joseph Agnew. It claims that Agnew lost his scholarship after he […]

Suit claims antitrust law violations

The NCAA was sued in federal court Monday in a case that seeks to overturn the governing body's policy of putting one-year limits on athletic scholarships.

The suit was filed in California on behalf of former Rice football player Joseph Agnew. It claims that Agnew lost his scholarship after he underwent shoulder and ankle surgeries prior to his junior year in 2008. Rice changed coaching staffs after Agnew's freshman season, when he played in all 13 of the school's games. He appealed and had his scholarship reinstated for his junior year, but he did not play football.

Agnew's suit asks to represent other former players whose scholarships were not renewed.

The suit claims that the prohibition of multi-year scholarships, along with limits on the number of scholarships each school can give out, drives up the cost of an education for student athletes. It claims a violation of federal antitrust laws.

"The NCAA will tell you these limits are necessary to maintain a level playing field in college sports," said Steve Berman, one of Agnew's Seattle-based lawyers, in a release. "However, we believe the monopoly is designed to safeguard the school sports programs' profitability, which spawns multi-million dollar coaching contracts and rich revenue streams for the schools."

"The NCAA is reviewing the allegations," NCAA spokesman Bob Williams wrote in an e-mail to USA Today. "However, it should be noted that the award of athletic scholarships on a one-year, renewable basis is the more typical approach taken within higher education for talent-based and academic scholarships in general."

Since 1973, the NCAA has banned colleges from offering scholarships for longer than one academic year. Scholarships are often renewed annually, but schools can decide not to renew for just about any reason -- including athletic performance.

Information from ESPN investigative reporter Tom Farrey is included in this report.

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JD on the radio – KFNX 1100AM

October 11, 2010
[Audio clip: view full post to listen] A face for the radio! Hi, I just wanted to drop a quick note and let you know that I will be on the radio live! Friday October 8th at 4:45 -5:00 PM - And a second show added Tuesday October 12th at 3:15-3:30PM tune your radio to KFNX […]

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A face for the radio!

Hi, I just wanted to drop a quick note and let you know that I will be on the radio live!

Friday October 8th at 4:45 -5:00 PM -

And a second show added Tuesday October 12th at 3:15-3:30PM

tune your radio to KFNX 1100 AM

Or listen online at http://www.1100kfnx.com/

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AIMS scholarships: the Bad, the Ugly, the Cuts

October 3, 2010
Regents cut AIMS scholarships for Ariz. students By JONATHAN J. COOPER The Associated Press Published: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 11:47 AM MST TEMPE — Students who exceed standards on Arizona’s high school graduation exam will no longer get guaranteed tuition waivers to the three state universities, the Board of Regents voted Thursday. Regents said the […]

Regents cut AIMS scholarships for Ariz. students

By JONATHAN J. COOPER The Associated Press Published: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 11:47 AM MST

TEMPE — Students who exceed standards on Arizona’s high school graduation exam will no longer get guaranteed tuition waivers to the three state universities, the Board of Regents voted Thursday.

Regents said the program is too expensive without funding from the Legislature. They voted 9-1 to scale it back.

The 4-year-old program gives tuition waivers to students who exceed standards on a mandatory high school graduation exam known as Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards.

The AIMS scholarships cost about $12 million last year, far more than the nominal costs officials had projected.

Beginning with current high school sophomores, the scholarships will be harder to get and will be worth less money — one quarter of freshman-year tuition instead of the whole bill.

Responding to requests from university administrators, regents said the scholarships are too easy to earn because the AIMS test measures high school success, not college preparedness. The new standards will require students to also score in the 90th percentile on the ACT or SAT college entrance exams.

State schools superintendent Tom Horne, the lone dissenting vote, said the program was an effective motivation for smart teens to stay focused and excel in high school. Cutting the reward to one-quarter of tuition eliminates the incentive to work hard, he said.

“We have a fantastically successful program and we’re looking at destroying it,” Horne said.

After the meeting, Regent Fred DuVal did not dispute that the program has motivated students. But he said his job is to ensure that taxpayer money goes toward those who are equipped to succeed in college, and the AIMS test isn’t designed to pinpoint them.

Regents created the AIMS scholarship program in 2004 after university officials projected it would cost almost nothing. At the time, nearly all the college students whose AIMS scores would have qualified were already receiving other merit-based scholarships.

When the program became effective in 2006, 1,565 new freshmen received the scholarship. By 2009, the number had nearly doubled, according to a regents staff report.

Regents initially considered scaling back the scholarships for current high school juniors, who have already taken AIMS. In a compromise with opponents, they moved the effective date back a year so it applies only to students who have not yet taken the exam.

J.D.'s comments: I have found some very interesting things about the college and university system. Things that the financial aid departments hope you never figure out. (‘Cause they want to hand out as little aid as possible and keep building these enormous Billion Dollar endowment funds as is evident by the AIMS scholarship cuts.) Arizona State University’s endowment fund is a whopping $407,889,000.00 as of 2010 according to the US News and World Report. Yes you read that right; it is nearly $ ½ a Billion Dollars!

Reducing your cost for a higher college education can be accomplished by strategically positioning yourself and your child through proprietary methodology. This is where AZ College Consulting, LLC - AZCollegePlanning.com Arizona's premier college planning firm can help you. Contact us now. 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2 (mention you saw this article.)

Here is a silly question, but I have to ask it. Do you want to pay full sticker price for college regardless of if it is in state, public or a private college? Call us now.

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Big corporations recruit from larger state colleges

September 26, 2010
Employers Favor State Schools for Hires By JENNIFER MERRITT from the Wall Street Journal U.S. companies largely favor graduates of big state universities over Ivy League and other elite liberal-arts schools when hiring to fill entry-level jobs, a Wall Street Journal study found. Jennifer Merritt discusses a new Wall Street Journal survey, which reveals recruiters […]

Employers Favor State Schools for Hires

By JENNIFER MERRITT from the Wall Street Journal

U.S. companies largely favor graduates of big state universities over Ivy League and other elite liberal-arts schools when hiring to fill entry-level jobs, a Wall Street Journal study found.

Jennifer Merritt discusses a new Wall Street Journal survey, which reveals recruiters are shifting their attention away from elite private schools to focus instead on state universities.

In the study—which surveyed 479 of the largest public and private companies, nonprofits and government agencies—Pennsylvania State University, Texas A&M University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ranked as top picks for graduates best prepared and most able to succeed.

Of the top 25 schools as rated by these employers, 19 were public, one was Ivy League (Cornell University) and the rest were private, including Carnegie Mellon and University of Notre Dame.

The Journal research represents a systematic effort to assess colleges by surveying employers' recruiters—who decide where to seek out new hires—instead of relying primarily on measures such as student test scores, college admission rates or graduates' starting salaries. As a group, the survey participants hired more than 43,000 new graduates in the past year.

The recruiters' perceptions matter all the more given that employers today are visiting fewer schools, partly due to the weak economy. Instead of casting a wide net, the Journal found, big employers are focusing more intently on nearby or strategically located research institutions with whom they can forge deeper partnerships with faculty.

The Journal study didn't examine smaller companies because they generally don't interact with as many colleges. In addition, the survey focused on hiring students with bachelor's as opposed to graduate degrees.

The research highlighted a split in perception about state and private schools. Recruiters who named an Ivy League or elite liberal-arts school as a top pick say they prize their graduates' intellect and cachet among clients, as well as "soft skills" like critical thinking and communication. But many companies said they need people with practical skills to serve as operations managers, product developers, business analysts and engineers. For those employees—the bulk of their work force—they turn to state institutions or other private schools offering that.

original article here

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Does a college degree guarantee job security -WSJ

September 23, 2010
College Grads Expand Lead in Job Security By CONOR DOUGHERTY from the Wall Street Journal GARY, Ind.—Fifteen years after high school, the working lives of Tremell Sinclair and Phyllis Sellars have evolved very differently, largely because of a single decision. That decision has always shaped their economic prospects, but never more so than during the […]

College Grads Expand Lead in Job Security

By CONOR DOUGHERTY from the Wall Street Journal

GARY, Ind.—Fifteen years after high school, the working lives of Tremell Sinclair and Phyllis Sellars have evolved very differently, largely because of a single decision.

That decision has always shaped their economic prospects, but never more so than during the recent recession: Ms. Sellars kept her white-collar job, recently landing a pay raise, while Mr. Sinclair was laid off from his forklift driving job last year and only just found a new one—at a 46% lower salary.

The classmates illustrate a divide between the fortunes of Americans with college degrees and those without. It's not only that the college educated earn more, but that they are far more likely to keep their jobs when times get tough.

By some measures, recession has exacerbated the divide. The unemployment rate for workers 25-and-older with a bachelor's degree or higher was 4.6% in August, for example, compared with 10.3% for those with just a high-school diploma. That's a 5.7-percentage-point gap, compared with a gap of only 2.6 percentage points in December 2007 when the recession began.

Laid-off college graduates are also finding work faster. Their median duration of unemployment was 18.4 weeks as of August, compared with 27.5 weeks for high-school grads. Three years ago, that figure was roughly the same for both groups—9.5 weeks and 9.6, respectively. And among the worst-off 25-and-older workers, the 5.2 million who have been out of work six months or more, only 19% are those who graduated from college, even though that group makes up a third of the work force.

Yet because college is increasingly expensive and doesn't guarantee a good job at a good wage, skepticism about the value of college is rising, even as the government pours more money into helping people get degrees. As part of the health-care legislation passed in March, Congress approved a student-loan overhaul that replaces private lenders with the federal Department of Education and redirects some $60 billion to community colleges and programs such as Pell Grants, which are college loans for the needy.

To economists who look at the numbers, college is a necessary, even if not sufficient, ticket to the middle class. "We are experiencing a period of shared misery, where workers at all education levels are struggling, including those with a college degree," says Lawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning Washington think tank. Still, he says, "It is certainly evident that those with college educations are faring much better than those with less education."

Not that a diploma is the slam-dunk it once was. It no longer guarantees a wage that rises faster than inflation. And while people with four-year college degrees make, on average, 64% more than those with only high-school degrees, that wage premium hasn't climbed much since 2001, after rising sharply for two decades.

Meantime, the unemployment rate for people with a college degree or higher, though lower than others', is the highest it has been since comparable data begin in 1979, according to an analysis of Labor Department data by the Economic Policy Institute. Even in the early 1980s recession, when national unemployment hit 10.8%, the rate for people with college degree or higher never eclipsed 3.9%.

College tuition has also grown faster than the rate of inflation for more than two decades, including a 6% increase in 2009—a period when overall prices fell. Some 64% of Americans thought college was a good investment in July, down from 79% a year earlier, according to a telephone poll of 3,000 individuals conducted in July for Country Financial, a Bloomington, Ill., financial-services company.

In Gary, many still see college as a ticket out of town. The predominantly African-American city sits on the tip of Lake Michigan, just outside Chicago. The city was named for a founder of United States Steel Corp., Elbert Gary, and steel remains the biggest private industry. But over the decades, Gary has hemorrhaged manufacturing jobs.

At a recent reunion picnic for West Side High's class of 1995, the school's orange-and-blue colors were everywhere, coloring tablecloths, balloons and even the shoelaces of Shantel Douglas, the reunion's primary organizer. The recession has hit almost everyone, she says, which is why she made it a "recession friendly" weekend. Instead of in a restaurant or hall, she held the picnic on the worn playing fields behind the school. The school let them gather there for free.

Ms. Sellars, 33, says she still feels tightly connected to her alma mater. Raised by a single mother, she says the industrial decline she saw growing up made her determined to get an education. She studied hard and gravitated toward friends also bound for college. Mr. Sinclair was part of her high school group of friends and on occasion she has gone to dinner with him on visits to Gary.

Lately, though, she says, the two haven't spoken as frequently, in part because she is so busy at work. "I'm busy and have a high-stress job," she says.

After West Side, Ms. Sellars majored in sociology at Indiana University. After graduation she went to work at Covance Inc., which is based in Princeton, N.J., but has facilities in Indianapolis. Her first job with the company, which runs clinical-drug trials, was editing company manuals.

Ms. Sellars worked her way up through progressively better jobs. In January was promoted to supervisor in a division that receives samples sent in for processing. She bought a condominium in 2004, and shares responsibility for overseeing 52 employees.

"I knew if I didn't go to college, I wouldn't have had a chance," she says.

Mr. Sinclair, 34, says he thought about going to college, too. But his mother couldn't afford to send him. Instead, he got a $12-per-hour job operating heavy equipment after he graduated. Over the years he worked his way up through a series of blue-collar jobs, topping out at $24 per hour driving a forklift.

But then last summer, just before his high-school class began planning its 15-year reunion, he got laid off. He spent a year seeking work as a heavy-equipment operator, and also in retail stores. He says he got a callback from Menards, but didn't pursue it after he learned that job paid less than his unemployment checks.

Mr. Sinclair says he recently found another forklift job. But it doesn't start until October and pays only $13 an hour, about as much as he was making just after he graduated.

To keep costs low during his unemployment, he cut out cable television and restaurant meals. Instead of paying for the reunion barbeque, Mr. Sinclair set up a backyard grill in the parking lot, where he cooked chicken wings he'd brought from home in a plastic bag sealed tight with marinade. "It's rough," he said as he turned the wings over with tongs.

Workers like Mr. Sinclair were losing ground relative to their college-educated counterparts long before the recession. Workers with a college degree or more saw inflation-adjusted hourly earnings grow 20%, on average, between 1979 and 2007, while those with graduate and professional degrees saw a 31% rise, according to an analysis of government data by David Autor, an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Earnings for workers with a high-school diploma fell over that period.

That actually understates the case, Prof. Autor adds, because degree-holders generally have jobs with better health-care and retirement benefits.

Despite this, the recession has sharpened a longstanding debate about the value of a college degree. For Brandon Fleming, another 1995 West Side graduate, the burden of college debt loads, coupled with stagnant wages, has made him question whether it was worth getting his diploma.

He attended Kentucky State University and today is a compliance analyst at an insurance company in Indianapolis. He makes just under $40,000 a year, almost as much as he had in loans for college and an MBA degree. "I wouldn't tell someone not to go to college," he said as he ate his reunion lunch behind his old high school. "But they have to go in with the proper expectations, and I didn't understand that."

His classmate, Rick "Big Rick" Castillo, went to a technical college but dropped out after a year to work at a local steel mill. Now he makes $58,000 annually, enough to afford things like the shiny Ninja motorcycle he rode to the reunion. "It's one of the better jobs in the area," he says.

Today, with unemployment at 9.6% and 15 million people looking for work, employers are receiving a flood of resumes from college-educated workers who might not have applied for jobs that require less education when times were better. That's another obstacle to applicants with less education.

Ms. Sellars has seen this up close. The employees she oversees aren't required to have college degrees, though some do. Recently, the company has seen a spike in applications from candidates with bachelor's degrees, says Deborah Tanner, a senior vice president at Covance.

"We have probably hired more degreed people [in Ms. Sellars' unit] that we had in the past," says Ms. Tanner. "What the recession has done is broadened the talent pool."

The Wall Street Journal article here

Need help reducing your costs of a college degree, contact us now!

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College fair Phoenix, Scottsdale, Chandler

September 21, 2010
Phoenix Convention Center is host a college fair on September 26th Sunday. Fair Hours: Sunday, September 26, 2010 11:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. (200 colleges will be in attendance.) Also on the same day is the Scottsdale College Fair in the evening, Sunday, September 26, 2010 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. at the Scottsdale Center for […]

Phoenix Convention Center is host a college fair on September 26th Sunday. Fair Hours: Sunday, September 26, 2010 11:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. (200 colleges will be in attendance.)

Also on the same day is the Scottsdale College Fair in the evening, Sunday, September 26, 2010 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. at the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts. This website is easier to use than the NACAC website. (100 colleges will be in attendance)

Scottsdale Christian Academy SCA 4400 N Tatum Boulevard, Phoenix, is hosting the National Christian College Fair from 6 PM to 8 PM see the website for more information (34 colleges will be in attendance)

And for those of you who live in the east valley, Valley Christian High School, 6900 W. Galveston Street, Chandler is hosting the National Christian College Fair from 6 PM to 8 PM on October 18th.  See the website for more information (34 colleges will be in attendance)

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Why an airline ticket is the same as college

September 21, 2010
The next time you are on an airplane, or see a commercial on TV for an airline, know that every passenger around you paid a different price for their seat. Some paid more, some paid less. College is no different.  In both cases, whether you’re buying an airline ticket or paying for college, the best and […]

The next time you are on an airplane, or see a commercial on TV for an airline, know that every passenger around you paid a different price for their seat. Some paid more, some paid less. College is no different.  In both cases, whether you’re buying an airline ticket or paying for college, the best and most knowledgeable person pays the least. We are here to give you that expert advice.

J.D. Wyczalek (why-zall-ick)
AZCollegePlanning.com

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Expert reveals how to reduce what you pay for a college higher education.

September 20, 2010
Expert reveals how to reduce what you pay for a college higher education. Buy the best education for less than what you would be paying for second best or a third-rate college using closely guarded secrets the college financial aid department hopes you never discover. Do you want the best for your child but don’t […]

Expert reveals how to reduce what you pay for a college higher education.

Buy the best education for less than what you would be paying for second best or a third-rate college using closely guarded secrets the college financial aid department hopes you never discover.

Do you want the best for your child but don’t want to go broke sending him/her to college? There is an answer.

As a service to the community, FREE workshop are provided to give parents and students a head start on what they should and shouldn’t be doing when it comes to college.

Next workshops October 20 Wednesday or October 28 Thursday at the Mustang Library Scottsdale (101/Shea) 6:15 PM to 7:30 PM. Registration is required. Click the RSVP button

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MTV prompts ads to promote finding financial aid ideas

September 16, 2010
Is this a marketing ploy or does the College Board and MTV really want to help find a solution? Here is an article by JACQUES STEINBERG a writer for the New York Times. MTV — Yes, MTV — Wants Your Financial Aid Ideas As the stern proctor of the hardly hip SAT exam, the College […]

Is this a marketing ploy or does the College Board and MTV really want to help find a solution?

Here is an article by JACQUES STEINBERG a writer for the New York Times.

MTV — Yes, MTV — Wants Your Financial Aid Ideas

As the stern proctor of the hardly hip SAT exam, the College Board would seem an odd recipient of prominent attention on MTV. It is difficult to imagine a scantily clad, lip-synching Katy Perry – to say nothing of Snooki or the Situation – rolling on a beach with a No. 2 pencil and a bubble sheet.

And yet, the music channel and the College Board are scheduled to announce this morning that they are joining together to stage a contest, the “Get Schooled College Affordability Challenge.’’ In it, “current and aspiring college students’’ are being asked to create “an innovative digital tool that helps more low- and middle-income students connect with money for school.’’

The winning individual or team will get $10,000, as well as a $100,000 budget to bring the idea to fruition. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is helping to underwrite the project.

The announcement was made by John Legend, the Grammy-winning rhythm-and-blues singer, in a classroom at Howard University. His visit was recorded for the series “Stand In,’’ where celebrities play professor for a day; the series is shown on mtvU, the network’s channel for college and university students.

Mr. Legend’s educational background is a story in itself: mostly home-schooled through the sixth grade, he went on to graduate magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999.

In a statement, the partners said that the contest was intended to raise college completion rates “by making it easier for students to navigate what can be a confusing financial aid maze.’’

“Difficulty paying for college,’’ the statement added, “is a key reason many college students fail to graduate.’’

Need help with college, figuring out how to pay for it, or even what major/career to go into, contact us. We can help. Give us a call.

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