Do You Know How Need-Based Aid Works

January 30, 2012
Through proper positioning some six figure income families have been able to qualify for need based aid at some colleges. Talk to us, we’ll let you know if you might be able to qualify for need based aid. There is more in the formula than just financial numbers. Check out the FAFSA guide Line-by-line instruction on maximizing need based aid qualifications.

Money For College - Do You Know How Need-Based Aid Works?
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

Need-Based College Aid is a simple mathematical formula:

The amount it costs to go to a particular college MINUS your Estimated Family Contribution or EFC.

Simple enough, but somewhat more complex when you get into the details. Let's start with EFC.

To determine your EFC, you have to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. The window to file this starts January 1 prior to the Fall semester you expect to get funding based on that particular application. This means that if you plan to start college in the fall of 2012, the FAFSA submission window starts January 1, 2012 and goes, theoretically, to the 30th of June, 2012 -- to accommodate the entire school year. It is theoretically possible to apply for aid based on the FAFSA into the second semester of the initial year. I don't suggest you push the theoretical bounds.

Based on the FAFSA data -- which most of which is extracted from your previous year's tax return -- you get a dollar figure for the EFC. This figure is what the FAFSA people compute to be what the family should be able to "contribute" towards the cost of education based on some secret government formula. Now, I don't know anybody who ever agreed with the EFC they received, but that's irrelevant to this discussion.

Now, each college has a "cost" figure computed for it. This figure includes tuition, fees, books, room & board and other living expenses. A separate figure is used for those on campus and those not, based on what you submitted on the FAFSA.

You take this cost figure and subtract the EFC and you get the "Need," the amount of money you "need" to attend that particular college. This "need" figure will vary from college to college based on the established cost for that college.

Examples: If your EFC is $6,000 and the cost of the college is $12,000, your "need" is $6,000. If the cost of the college is $25,000, your "need" is $19,000.

At this point the Finical Aid office at the college assembles a "need" package of financial aid consisting of a possible mixture of grants (you don't have to pay back), loans (you have to pay back, maybe), and/or Student Work/Study where you work and get paid while going to college. The actual composition of the package is based on a whole different set of criteria, where there is some wiggle room you can work with the folks at the college financial aid office.

Regardless of your financial situation, you need to file a FAFSA and see what you might be able to get. Far too many people feel that they won't qualify, so they simply bypass the FAFSA and probably pay a lot more than they should have. FAFSA information is available at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Side note: through proper asset positioning some six figure income families have been able to qualify for need based aid at some colleges.  Talk to us, we’ll let you know if you might be able to qualify for need based aid. There is more in the formula than just financial numbers. Check out the FAFSA guide Line-by-line instruction on maximizing need based aid qualifications under the Parents Tab.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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Everybody is Entitled to Government Funding For College

January 28, 2012
Money For College - Did You Know Everybody is Entitled to Government Funding For College? by Dr. Kuni Beasley EVERYBODY (citizens and legal residents) in the US is entitled to some sort of federal aid -- EVERYBODY! It doesn't matter how much you make or how poor you are, you are entitled to some form […]

Money For College - Did You Know Everybody is Entitled to Government Funding For College?
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

EVERYBODY (citizens and legal residents) in the US is entitled to some sort of federal aid -- EVERYBODY! It doesn't matter how much you make or how poor you are, you are entitled to some form of government aid. Many people feel they make too much money to qualify for government aid and forgo their entitlements and spend way too much of their own money for college.

Federal student aid comes in three forms: grants, loans, and work/study programs.

Most people have heard of the Pell Grant -- originally called the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) and named after Senator Claiborne Pell of Rhode Island, who passed away January 1, 2009 (bit of trivia here). The Pell is aimed at lower income students. Statisticians use the Pell Grant as a marker to determine the economic diversity of student at a particular college (a bit more trivia). Next in line is the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), issued to students with extreme financial need.

Three other lesser known grants are also available: the Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG), the National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant a.k.a., the National SMART Grant, and a new one, the Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education or TEACH Grant. The ACG is for students who completed a rigorous high school curriculum with distinction and is applied to the first two years of college. The SMART grant targets math, science, technology, and engineering students in their last two years (third year if in a five year program). Both of these are awarded on top of the Pell Grant. The TEACH grant targets students who are training to be teachers and are willing to work in a high-need field in low income areas.

These are grants and do not have to be repaid.

The Stafford Loan is the predominant loan program for students and the PLUS Loan for parents and graduate students. These Federal loans are the confluence of two loan programs, the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) and the Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

Now, get ready for little shell game to help understand these loans. There is kind of a matrix with the FFEL and Direct Loans across the top and Stafford and PLUS along the side. The FFEL and Direct Loan programs are differentiated by where the loan is made. Under the FFEL, the loan is made by a commercial lender (bank, credit union, etc.); under the Direct Loan, the loan comes directly from the Federal government. The Stafford and the PLUS can come from either the FFEL or the Direct Loan sources.

The Stafford is further divided into subsidized and unsubsidized loans. Subsidized loans are awarded based on need and the government pays the interest while the student is in school. The unsubsidized is not based on need and the interest accrues while the student is in school.

PLUS loans are made based on the credit check of the parents. These can be paid back 60 days after the loan is disbursed or 6 months after the student finishes or leaves school.

Everybody is entitled to at least the unsubsidized Stafford Loan regardless of income.

You have to file a Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for any Federal grant or loan http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/.

Loans are a good thing if you cannot afford the cost of college. However, I am not a big advocate of borrowing. The student could easily end up with a loan payment as big as a mortgage payment and have no house to show for it. I don't think any school in the country is worth that much. But, I have had parents disagree with me and borrow upwards of $150,000 (combined parents and student) to put their kids through a high priced college.

Wouldn't had been easier just to make better grades and higher SAT and ACT scores?

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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Four Sources of College Funding in Plain English

January 28, 2012
there are four places to find money for college, and one place you must avoid at all cost.

Money For College - Four Sources of College Funding in Plain English
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

Here are four sources of college funding:

1 -- Merit Aid is "money" the college awards you based on your academic, athletic, or artistic abilities. There is really no such thing as a football scholarship. These are officially grants-in-aid where a dollar figure is credited to the students' account. Merit Aid is simply the college waiving normal costs to the college in exchange for the student's attendance or participation in college activities.

2 -- Need-Based Aid -- This is calculated based on the information submitted using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Need is defined as the difference between what the FAFSA people determine what your Effective Family Contribution (EFC) should be and the total annual cost for the college. The difference between the two is the Need and you can access federal, state, and college based programs to fulfill the Need amount.

3 -- Entitlement Aid -- This is often missed because many people -- including those who are supposed to know -- don't know. You may have entitlements based on your geographical location (in-state tuition vs. out of state), past military service (like the GI Bill), special category (like the blind, hearing impaired, foster children or children of deceased fire, police, or military members), and special status (mothers going back to college, Native Americans, people training to be teachers). Beyond these categories lie the vast gamut of government loans that virtually anyone in the United States (citizens and legal residents) qualify to receive.

4 -- Private Source Aid -- One of the big tools scholarship scammers use is the abundance of private scholarships that "go unused" every year. There are many thousands of private scholarships awarded each year. Many are made through a particular college, or, like the National Merit Scholarship, awarded to the student, but dispersed through the college, or, in several cases, a check from the private provider is simply presented to the student. Most of these are tied to academic performance, but many are targeted to specific groups -- ethnic, gender, national origin, activity, etc. For example, the National Achievement Scholarship parallels the National Merit Scholarship, but targets African-American students. See Scholarship Scam Articles here.

Conceptually, we seek multiple methods of college funding to reduce the amount of your money that comes out of your pocket in order to pay for college. We seek more ways to pay less through grants and scholarships, to defer for payment later (loans), or to get costs discounted or waived, in order to keep more of your money in your pocket.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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Getting Started SAT Prep What You Need to Know

January 26, 2012
A good SAT score can open doors, a great SAT score can unlock incredible scholarships.

Getting Started in SAT Prep - What You Need to Know But Nobody Tells You
By Dr. Kuni Beasley

Most high school students are told they need to take the SAT and many are told that they need to "get ready" for it, but nobody seems to tell the vast majority of students where they need to start and what they need to do. Everything you need to know is available online. The problem is there is no systematic procedure or checklist to help you navigate the start-up process - until now! Here are four things you need to start:

Student Information - Go to the College Board website and click SAT. Become VERY familiar with the information on ALL the links that pertain to you. This will take an hour or so, so invest this time into yourself.

Parent Information - There is a section for parents on the website. Have your parents review the information on this site.

Online Practice - Take the Online Practice Questions. Don't short-cut yourself on this. Make sure you read each link associated with these pages so you thoroughly understand how the SAT will ask questions. Read each question, select your answer, and review the answer explanations to see how you did. Keep track of which ones you got correct and which ones you didn't.

Practice Test - Download the SAT Practice Test and the scoring sheet, and take the test. We recommend you print the test out and take it a pencil, and grade your test.

The College Board website is at http://www.collegeboard.com.

Here are five SAT things to sign up for FREE:

1. Get a user account and have your parents get one.
2. SAT Question of the Day - this keeps your brain in the SAT Mode - thinking about it every day.
3. Note the testing dates and the deadlines for registering
4. Go through the Skill Insights and Answers Imagined section online
5. Get the newsletters for both you and your parents

The College Board site also has My College Quick Start, College Search resources, and more.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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Getting Started ACT Prep What You Need to Know

January 24, 2012
Getting Started in ACT Prep - What You Need to Know But Nobody Tells You by Dr. Kuni Beasley Most high school students are told they need to take the ACT and many are told that they need to "get ready" for it, but nobody seems to tell the vast majority of students where they […]

Getting Started in ACT Prep - What You Need to Know But Nobody Tells You
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

Most high school students are told they need to take the ACT and many are told that they need to "get ready" for it, but nobody seems to tell the vast majority of students where they need to start and what they need to do. Everything you need to know is available online. The problem is there is no systematic procedure or checklist to help you navigate the start-up process - until now! Here are four things you need to start:

Student Information - Go to the ACT Main website and set up an account. Become VERY familiar with the information on ALL the links that pertain to you. This will take an hour or so, so invest this time into yourself.

Parent Information - There is a section for parents. Have your parents review the information on this site.

Online Practice - Read the Test Descriptions and Test Tips.

Take the ACT Practice Test Questions. Read each question, select your answer, and review the answer explanations to see how you did. Keep track of which ones you got correct and which ones you didn't.

Preview Test Tips.

Download Preparing for the ACT. Read and review pages 1-12.

Preview Test Descriptions.

Practice Test - Take the ACT Practice Test in Preparing for the ACT. We recommend you print the test out and take it a pencil, and grade your test.

Grade your Practice Test and figure out how many you got correct and the number incorrect.

You'll have a pretty good idea where you are what you'll need to do to increase your score.

The ACT website is http://www.actstudent.org

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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Which One Should I Take – SAT Or ACT?

January 22, 2012
Which One Should I Take - SAT Or ACT? Millions of Students Ask This Question Each Year Every year, millions of high school students ask this question and few actually get a definitive answer. There are differences between the two tests and if you know what makes them different, you can plan a better college testing strategy to best position you for admissions and scholarships.

Which One Should I Take - SAT Or ACT? Millions of Students Ask This Question Each Year
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

Every year, millions of high school students ask this question and few actually get a definitive answer. There are differences between the two tests and if you know what makes them different, you can plan a better college testing strategy to best position you for admissions and scholarships.

The ACT - for American College Testing - is in Iowa City, Iowa. The ACT consists of four sections - English (45 minutes), Math (60 minutes), Reading (35 minutes), and Science (35 minutes), with an optional Writing section (30 minutes). ACT scores are calculated for each section (English, Math, Reading, and Science) then a composite score is derived from those section scores.

The SAT comes from the College Board - technically, the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB), in New York City. SAT used to stand for Scholastic Aptitude Test, but doesn't stand for anything anymore. The actual test questions are developed by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) in Princeton, New Jersey - that's where the Princeton Review gets its name - because it was started in Princeton, NJ, not because it has any relationship with Princeton University.

The SAT has three components: Reading, Math, and Writing. These are spread out in ten test sections.

Now - for the differences:

Difference Number 1:

Do you know what SOHCAHTOA is? No, this not a Native American tribe from upper New York state. If you know what this means, then you are probably better prepared to take the ACT than someone who does not. The answer is at the bottom of this article.

Difference Number 2:

The ACT is a curriculum based test, which means that questions are based on what students are supposed to have learned in high school English, Math, and Science. This can be good or bad, depending on your perspective. If you didn't learn much in high school, it will probably show on your ACT score. If you learned what you were supposed to, that, too, will probably reflect on your score.

The SAT is supposed to be an aptitude test, which means it is supposed to test your ability to think or analyze, or something like that. This means (theoretically) that if you didn't learn much in high school because you were bored out of your gourd because you are actually some sort of latent underachieving genius, it will show up on this test. This perspective has some validity, because there are many underachieving otherwise intelligent kids who make terrible grades yet score high on the SAT. The opposite is also true. There are many hard-working high school students who make good grades, but score poorly on the SAT.

Difference Number 3:

The Essay. Back in 2005 the SAT made massive changes and one of those was to include an Essay. ACT followed up with an optional essay. The reality is that after four years, many colleges completely discount the SAT Writing component, including the Essay because of problems with grading consistency. These colleges usually use the Math and Reading scores.

This is where you need to do your homework. Find out if the colleges you are considering actually use the SAT Essay or require the ACT essay. You have to watch out. Although many colleges "officially" do not consider the SAT Writing and Essay, they still get the scores with those components, and... with those scores right there in front of them, may influence their perspective even though they are not "officially" considered.

My recommendation is that you take both - preferably in your junior year - and see how you do on them. Don't send your scores to any colleges until you have scores you want to send.

Oh - SOHCAHTOA is the acronym for the Trig functions: Sin = Opposite/Hypotenuse; Cosin = Adjacent/Hypotenuse; Tangent = Opposite/Adjacent. The SAT only goes through Algebra II. Trig is on the ACT.

Kuni Michael Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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Four Critical Things You Need to Know About Filing the FAFSA

January 21, 2012
Money For College - Four Critical Things You Need to Know About Filing the FAFSA by Dr. Kuni Beasley The Free Application for Federal Financial Aid or FAFSA, is where most college funding starts and here is what you need to know about it: 1 -- Who actually processes the FAFSA? The people who do […]

Money For College - Four Critical Things You Need to Know About Filing the FAFSA
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

The Free Application for Federal Financial Aid or FAFSA, is where most college funding starts and here is what you need to know about it:

1 -- Who actually processes the FAFSA? The people who do the ACT process the FAFSA. I guess some years ago when the SAT people and the ACT people decided to divide the college testing universe, Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and a few other things were retained by the College Board, which does the SAT. The ACT people got the NCAA qualification process and the FAFSA. This is the simple version of how the universe was divided.

2 -- Who needs to file the FAFSA? The short answer -- EVERYBODY! I don't care if you won the lottery or your grandfather donated the money for the science building, you still need to file the FAFSA. Although the FAFSA results are used for Need-Based Aid, those seeking Merit-Based Aid (i.e., "scholarships") usually have to pass through the FAFSA process. Colleges have you do this even if you are getting an academic scholarship because for each scholarship dollar they give you, that's money they forfeit. To mitigate the money that are not getting from you because you are getting a "scholarship," they will see if there are other sources of money that you would be eligible for that could be applied towards the money they are forfeiting up to give you a "scholarship."

3. When do you need to file the FAFSA? The short answer is -- right after ball drops in Times Square. I tell the parents of my students to send in the FAFSA when they get back from the New Year's Eve Party. Seriously, the sooner, the better. The FAFSA requires tax information from the previous year, but I don't know anyone who has their taxes ready when the ball drops. It is best to get your taxes done early and get that data on the FAFSA. However, if you don't have the taxes done by, let's say, Valentine's Day, you can submit the FAFSA with estimated information and send an update later.

4. Where do I get the FAFSA? Online at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. The form is pretty straight forward and simple. However, millions of parents get "FAFSA Phobia," and seek assistance. There are many people out there who are willing to treat the "phobia," but be careful. A lot of these people can scam you. There is also a site to help you estimate your FAFSA results at http://www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov. I recommend you try the sites yourself first and if you still have the "phobia," get some reputable help. (Side note: check out my FAFSA guide. This guide covers the FAFSA line by line, and explains how to fill it out for your student's benefit. Login to view it.)

The FAFSA, Need-Based Aid, and the entire maze of college funding can be both confusing and intimidating. I hope this eased some of that for you.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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Five Things You Need to Know About Long Term PSAT SAT ACT Preparation

January 20, 2012
how old or what grade should I be in when I take the SAT or ACT test? You'll be surprised when you see the answer.

Five Things You Need to Know About Long Term PSAT-SAT-ACT Preparation
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

There are five things you need to know about long term PSAT-SAT-ACT preparation. It is as easy as A-E-I-O-U: You need to have Awareness, start Early, make it an Iterative process, take the tests Often, and Understand how the raising your scores can help you get into the college of your choice and help you secure better college funding.

Awareness:
• PSAT is geared to 11th graders and offered in OCTOBER ONLY. Anyone can take it and you register at your local school. The PSAT is used to qualify students for National Merit Scholarship competition. 6th - 10th graders should take it for practice.
• There is a wealth of information on the CollegeBoard.com and ACT.org website. Students and parents should sign up for the information they provide.

Early:
• Start in 6th grade for practice - take PSAT in October for practice and take 1 SAT and 1 ACT for practice per year through Middle School.
• The Duke Talent Identification Program is available for qualifying 7th graders. Check with your school for information on this. They usually test for this in the 6th grade.
• In the 9th - 10th take the PSAT for practice in October for practice, and 2 SATs and 2 ACTs for practice per year.
• Take a heavy duty prep course the summer between grades 10 and 11.
• In the 11th grade, take the PSAT for record in October and 2 SATs and 2 ACTs for record. The goal is wrap up a good score by the end of the junior year.
• In the 12th grade, take tests as needed.

Iterative:
• The more you take the tests, the more you gain Test Maturity - become more confident and competent with the tests.
• Even the SAT people have said you could gain 50 points per SAT through experience.
• Gain experience first, and then gain expertise. We really want you to have a few tests under your belt before you start any hard core prep.
• Training will be easier because you understand the test and it will be faster to focus on improving instead of digging out the basics of each test.

Often:
• Take the tests often.
• You can take the SAT and PSAT an unlimited number of times and take the ACT up to 12 times.

Understanding:
• Many colleges award scholarships for SAT/ACT scores alone.
• Higher scores can overcome mediocre grades.
• The best Diagnostic is to take the real test under real test conditions.

The best long term approach is to start early gaining experience and polish with expertise later. The BEST DIAGNOSTIC is the REAL test taken in a REAL environment. Take ALL the tests: PSAT, ACT, and SAT.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so.  Check out the other stuff on this website including How to get a Perfect SAT or ACT Score. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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University of Arizona CSS Profile required by some

January 15, 2012
The University of Arizona, Tucson, requires the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE for some students.

The University of Arizona, Tucson has once again changed their policy regarding financial aid forms for the 2012-13 school year.

Every student who applies to U of A should file the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

There is a second financial aid form called the CSS Profile. https://profileonline.collegeboard.com

According to U of A’s website (see below for details and a link to the website) only those students who have been “invited” are required to fill out the CSS Profile in addition to filing the FAFSA form.

Invited is a pleasant way of saying selected and required for additional audit.

Those who are “invited” will be notified via mail or email or on the student’s UA account (if your student applied online). Double and triple check to see if you were selected to file this additional form and get it submitted and done before the March 1 deadline.

Note there is an additional fee to file the CSS Profile of $25 for one school (additional schools is $16.)

If your student is selected to file the CSS Profile and they do not, you will not get any aid and the application will be considered incomplete. If required, get it in ASAP!

(Please note: if you are a client of mine please let me know right away if you are tagged to file the CSS Profile for U of A.)

-J.D.

 

https://financialaid.arizona.edu/impolicy/12-13

From the website.

Institutional Methodology Policy 2012-2013

The University of Arizona (UA) remains committed to ensuring that every student who qualifies for institutional aid receives it. In an effort to accurately award students based on an analysis of a family's ability to pay, the UA's Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid (OSFA) is now using Institutional Methodology (IM) for select groups of incoming students. Similar to Federal Methodology (FM), which is based on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), IM determines a family's ability to pay for college costs but is more comprehensive, accurate, and current than the FM calculation. The UA bases its IM calculation on the College Board's CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE (PROFILE) for two groups of freshman students.

Who Must Complete the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE

By Invitation only:

  • Students who meet the following criteria will be invited to complete the PROFILE to determine Arizona Assurance eligibility:

o    Arizona Resident

o    Family income (wages or adjusted gross income) of $42,400 or below and be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant

o    Unweighted cumulative high school GPA of 3.0 or higher (on a 4.0 scale)*

o    Submit an application for admission and all required supporting materials to UA by March 1st

o    Complete the FAFSA by March 1st (UA code is 001083)

o    Dependent student

o    Enroll full-time at the UA directly after high school

  • Students who meet the following criteria will be invited to complete the PROFILE to determine eligibility for institutional grant funds:

o    Non-Resident students

o    First time, full-time freshmen

o    Submit an application for admission and all required supporting materials to the University of Arizona by March 1st

o    Complete the FAFSA by March 1st

o    FAFSA EFC ≤ $25,000

Students are notified by invitation only if they must complete the PROFILE. Students should complete the PROFILE only if OSFA has requested that they do so. If OSFA has not requested that the student complete the PROFILE, the completion of this application will be of no benefit to the student.

Students will be notified of the invitation to complete the PROFILE via:

  • Their Next Steps Center
  • Their UAccess Student Center To Do List
  • UA Email

If the parents of the student are divorced/separated/never married or are living separately, the noncustodial parent must complete the Noncustodial PROFILE (NCP). Students who are unable to complete the NCP may submit a Request for Waiver of Noncustodial PROFILE. Students should speak with their Financial Aid Counselor if they feel they qualify to submit this request.

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the Wrong College Major will cost you, Big time!

November 10, 2011
The wrong college major will cost you big time in future pay and employment stabliity. Will your (or your student’s) college major pay and more importantly will the college major lead to a job? I came across a recent article on Yahoo News that led me to the Wall Street Journal. The WSJ article “From […]

The wrong college major will cost you big time in future pay and employment stabliity.

Will your (or your student’s) college major pay and more importantly will the college major lead to a job?

I came across a recent article on Yahoo News that led me to the Wall Street Journal.

The WSJ article “From College Major to Career” states the following:

Choosing the right college major can make a big difference in students' career prospects, in terms of employment and pay. Here’s a look at how various college majors fare in the job market, based on 2010 Census data. Some popular majors, such as nursing and finance, do particularly well, with unemployment under 5% and high salaries during the course of their careers.

There are certain majors that simply perpetuate themselves. For example, the only job that I can think of for a Philosophy major graduate is to teach philosophy. It’s the circle of life, study philosophy, graduate, teach others philosophy. Being a college professor is not a bad thing, IF that is what you want to do. (If you can think of another job with philosophy major please let me know. Maybe write a book, but that would still fall under the category of teach…)

Check out this link http://graphicsweb.wsj.com/documents/NILF1111/#term= for employment rates AND friend me on Facebook JD Joseph Wyczalek for more tips, and time lines.

While money is not everything, but neither is being broke and not being able to buy food or afford shelter. Take the time to
investigate majors, now, while still in high school. You will be miles ahead of the average student.

Need help with selecting the “right” major. We can help.

 

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