Getting Started SAT Prep What You Need to Know

January 26, 2012
A good SAT score can open doors, a great SAT score can unlock incredible scholarships.

Getting Started in SAT Prep - What You Need to Know But Nobody Tells You
By Dr. Kuni Beasley

Most high school students are told they need to take the SAT and many are told that they need to "get ready" for it, but nobody seems to tell the vast majority of students where they need to start and what they need to do. Everything you need to know is available online. The problem is there is no systematic procedure or checklist to help you navigate the start-up process - until now! Here are four things you need to start:

Student Information - Go to the College Board website and click SAT. Become VERY familiar with the information on ALL the links that pertain to you. This will take an hour or so, so invest this time into yourself.

Parent Information - There is a section for parents on the website. Have your parents review the information on this site.

Online Practice - Take the Online Practice Questions. Don't short-cut yourself on this. Make sure you read each link associated with these pages so you thoroughly understand how the SAT will ask questions. Read each question, select your answer, and review the answer explanations to see how you did. Keep track of which ones you got correct and which ones you didn't.

Practice Test - Download the SAT Practice Test and the scoring sheet, and take the test. We recommend you print the test out and take it a pencil, and grade your test.

The College Board website is at http://www.collegeboard.com.

Here are five SAT things to sign up for FREE:

1. Get a user account and have your parents get one.
2. SAT Question of the Day - this keeps your brain in the SAT Mode - thinking about it every day.
3. Note the testing dates and the deadlines for registering
4. Go through the Skill Insights and Answers Imagined section online
5. Get the newsletters for both you and your parents

The College Board site also has My College Quick Start, College Search resources, and more.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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Getting Started ACT Prep What You Need to Know

January 24, 2012
Getting Started in ACT Prep - What You Need to Know But Nobody Tells You by Dr. Kuni Beasley Most high school students are told they need to take the ACT and many are told that they need to "get ready" for it, but nobody seems to tell the vast majority of students where they […]

Getting Started in ACT Prep - What You Need to Know But Nobody Tells You
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

Most high school students are told they need to take the ACT and many are told that they need to "get ready" for it, but nobody seems to tell the vast majority of students where they need to start and what they need to do. Everything you need to know is available online. The problem is there is no systematic procedure or checklist to help you navigate the start-up process - until now! Here are four things you need to start:

Student Information - Go to the ACT Main website and set up an account. Become VERY familiar with the information on ALL the links that pertain to you. This will take an hour or so, so invest this time into yourself.

Parent Information - There is a section for parents. Have your parents review the information on this site.

Online Practice - Read the Test Descriptions and Test Tips.

Take the ACT Practice Test Questions. Read each question, select your answer, and review the answer explanations to see how you did. Keep track of which ones you got correct and which ones you didn't.

Preview Test Tips.

Download Preparing for the ACT. Read and review pages 1-12.

Preview Test Descriptions.

Practice Test - Take the ACT Practice Test in Preparing for the ACT. We recommend you print the test out and take it a pencil, and grade your test.

Grade your Practice Test and figure out how many you got correct and the number incorrect.

You'll have a pretty good idea where you are what you'll need to do to increase your score.

The ACT website is http://www.actstudent.org

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

 

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Which One Should I Take – SAT Or ACT?

January 22, 2012
Which One Should I Take - SAT Or ACT? Millions of Students Ask This Question Each Year Every year, millions of high school students ask this question and few actually get a definitive answer. There are differences between the two tests and if you know what makes them different, you can plan a better college testing strategy to best position you for admissions and scholarships.

Which One Should I Take - SAT Or ACT? Millions of Students Ask This Question Each Year
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

Every year, millions of high school students ask this question and few actually get a definitive answer. There are differences between the two tests and if you know what makes them different, you can plan a better college testing strategy to best position you for admissions and scholarships.

The ACT - for American College Testing - is in Iowa City, Iowa. The ACT consists of four sections - English (45 minutes), Math (60 minutes), Reading (35 minutes), and Science (35 minutes), with an optional Writing section (30 minutes). ACT scores are calculated for each section (English, Math, Reading, and Science) then a composite score is derived from those section scores.

The SAT comes from the College Board - technically, the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB), in New York City. SAT used to stand for Scholastic Aptitude Test, but doesn't stand for anything anymore. The actual test questions are developed by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) in Princeton, New Jersey - that's where the Princeton Review gets its name - because it was started in Princeton, NJ, not because it has any relationship with Princeton University.

The SAT has three components: Reading, Math, and Writing. These are spread out in ten test sections.

Now - for the differences:

Difference Number 1:

Do you know what SOHCAHTOA is? No, this not a Native American tribe from upper New York state. If you know what this means, then you are probably better prepared to take the ACT than someone who does not. The answer is at the bottom of this article.

Difference Number 2:

The ACT is a curriculum based test, which means that questions are based on what students are supposed to have learned in high school English, Math, and Science. This can be good or bad, depending on your perspective. If you didn't learn much in high school, it will probably show on your ACT score. If you learned what you were supposed to, that, too, will probably reflect on your score.

The SAT is supposed to be an aptitude test, which means it is supposed to test your ability to think or analyze, or something like that. This means (theoretically) that if you didn't learn much in high school because you were bored out of your gourd because you are actually some sort of latent underachieving genius, it will show up on this test. This perspective has some validity, because there are many underachieving otherwise intelligent kids who make terrible grades yet score high on the SAT. The opposite is also true. There are many hard-working high school students who make good grades, but score poorly on the SAT.

Difference Number 3:

The Essay. Back in 2005 the SAT made massive changes and one of those was to include an Essay. ACT followed up with an optional essay. The reality is that after four years, many colleges completely discount the SAT Writing component, including the Essay because of problems with grading consistency. These colleges usually use the Math and Reading scores.

This is where you need to do your homework. Find out if the colleges you are considering actually use the SAT Essay or require the ACT essay. You have to watch out. Although many colleges "officially" do not consider the SAT Writing and Essay, they still get the scores with those components, and... with those scores right there in front of them, may influence their perspective even though they are not "officially" considered.

My recommendation is that you take both - preferably in your junior year - and see how you do on them. Don't send your scores to any colleges until you have scores you want to send.

Oh - SOHCAHTOA is the acronym for the Trig functions: Sin = Opposite/Hypotenuse; Cosin = Adjacent/Hypotenuse; Tangent = Opposite/Adjacent. The SAT only goes through Algebra II. Trig is on the ACT.

Kuni Michael Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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Four Critical Things You Need to Know About Filing the FAFSA

January 21, 2012
Money For College - Four Critical Things You Need to Know About Filing the FAFSA by Dr. Kuni Beasley The Free Application for Federal Financial Aid or FAFSA, is where most college funding starts and here is what you need to know about it: 1 -- Who actually processes the FAFSA? The people who do […]

Money For College - Four Critical Things You Need to Know About Filing the FAFSA
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

The Free Application for Federal Financial Aid or FAFSA, is where most college funding starts and here is what you need to know about it:

1 -- Who actually processes the FAFSA? The people who do the ACT process the FAFSA. I guess some years ago when the SAT people and the ACT people decided to divide the college testing universe, Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and a few other things were retained by the College Board, which does the SAT. The ACT people got the NCAA qualification process and the FAFSA. This is the simple version of how the universe was divided.

2 -- Who needs to file the FAFSA? The short answer -- EVERYBODY! I don't care if you won the lottery or your grandfather donated the money for the science building, you still need to file the FAFSA. Although the FAFSA results are used for Need-Based Aid, those seeking Merit-Based Aid (i.e., "scholarships") usually have to pass through the FAFSA process. Colleges have you do this even if you are getting an academic scholarship because for each scholarship dollar they give you, that's money they forfeit. To mitigate the money that are not getting from you because you are getting a "scholarship," they will see if there are other sources of money that you would be eligible for that could be applied towards the money they are forfeiting up to give you a "scholarship."

3. When do you need to file the FAFSA? The short answer is -- right after ball drops in Times Square. I tell the parents of my students to send in the FAFSA when they get back from the New Year's Eve Party. Seriously, the sooner, the better. The FAFSA requires tax information from the previous year, but I don't know anyone who has their taxes ready when the ball drops. It is best to get your taxes done early and get that data on the FAFSA. However, if you don't have the taxes done by, let's say, Valentine's Day, you can submit the FAFSA with estimated information and send an update later.

4. Where do I get the FAFSA? Online at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. The form is pretty straight forward and simple. However, millions of parents get "FAFSA Phobia," and seek assistance. There are many people out there who are willing to treat the "phobia," but be careful. A lot of these people can scam you. There is also a site to help you estimate your FAFSA results at http://www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov. I recommend you try the sites yourself first and if you still have the "phobia," get some reputable help. (Side note: check out my FAFSA guide. This guide covers the FAFSA line by line, and explains how to fill it out for your student's benefit. Login to view it.)

The FAFSA, Need-Based Aid, and the entire maze of college funding can be both confusing and intimidating. I hope this eased some of that for you.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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Five Things You Need to Know About Long Term PSAT SAT ACT Preparation

January 20, 2012
how old or what grade should I be in when I take the SAT or ACT test? You'll be surprised when you see the answer.

Five Things You Need to Know About Long Term PSAT-SAT-ACT Preparation
by Dr. Kuni Beasley

There are five things you need to know about long term PSAT-SAT-ACT preparation. It is as easy as A-E-I-O-U: You need to have Awareness, start Early, make it an Iterative process, take the tests Often, and Understand how the raising your scores can help you get into the college of your choice and help you secure better college funding.

Awareness:
• PSAT is geared to 11th graders and offered in OCTOBER ONLY. Anyone can take it and you register at your local school. The PSAT is used to qualify students for National Merit Scholarship competition. 6th - 10th graders should take it for practice.
• There is a wealth of information on the CollegeBoard.com and ACT.org website. Students and parents should sign up for the information they provide.

Early:
• Start in 6th grade for practice - take PSAT in October for practice and take 1 SAT and 1 ACT for practice per year through Middle School.
• The Duke Talent Identification Program is available for qualifying 7th graders. Check with your school for information on this. They usually test for this in the 6th grade.
• In the 9th - 10th take the PSAT for practice in October for practice, and 2 SATs and 2 ACTs for practice per year.
• Take a heavy duty prep course the summer between grades 10 and 11.
• In the 11th grade, take the PSAT for record in October and 2 SATs and 2 ACTs for record. The goal is wrap up a good score by the end of the junior year.
• In the 12th grade, take tests as needed.

Iterative:
• The more you take the tests, the more you gain Test Maturity - become more confident and competent with the tests.
• Even the SAT people have said you could gain 50 points per SAT through experience.
• Gain experience first, and then gain expertise. We really want you to have a few tests under your belt before you start any hard core prep.
• Training will be easier because you understand the test and it will be faster to focus on improving instead of digging out the basics of each test.

Often:
• Take the tests often.
• You can take the SAT and PSAT an unlimited number of times and take the ACT up to 12 times.

Understanding:
• Many colleges award scholarships for SAT/ACT scores alone.
• Higher scores can overcome mediocre grades.
• The best Diagnostic is to take the real test under real test conditions.

The best long term approach is to start early gaining experience and polish with expertise later. The BEST DIAGNOSTIC is the REAL test taken in a REAL environment. Take ALL the tests: PSAT, ACT, and SAT.

Kuni Beasley, Ph. D., College Professor, High School Dean, and College Counselor.
No matter what I wrote above, it doesn't mean anything if you don't get into the college you want or have to go into debt up to your eyeballs to do so.  Check out the other stuff on this website including How to get a Perfect SAT or ACT Score. Contact us to see how we can help 1-888-237-2087 ext. 2.

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University of Arizona CSS Profile required by some

January 15, 2012
The University of Arizona, Tucson, requires the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE for some students.

The University of Arizona, Tucson has once again changed their policy regarding financial aid forms for the 2012-13 school year.

Every student who applies to U of A should file the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

There is a second financial aid form called the CSS Profile. https://profileonline.collegeboard.com

According to U of A’s website (see below for details and a link to the website) only those students who have been “invited” are required to fill out the CSS Profile in addition to filing the FAFSA form.

Invited is a pleasant way of saying selected and required for additional audit.

Those who are “invited” will be notified via mail or email or on the student’s UA account (if your student applied online). Double and triple check to see if you were selected to file this additional form and get it submitted and done before the March 1 deadline.

Note there is an additional fee to file the CSS Profile of $25 for one school (additional schools is $16.)

If your student is selected to file the CSS Profile and they do not, you will not get any aid and the application will be considered incomplete. If required, get it in ASAP!

(Please note: if you are a client of mine please let me know right away if you are tagged to file the CSS Profile for U of A.)

-J.D.

 

https://financialaid.arizona.edu/impolicy/12-13

From the website.

Institutional Methodology Policy 2012-2013

The University of Arizona (UA) remains committed to ensuring that every student who qualifies for institutional aid receives it. In an effort to accurately award students based on an analysis of a family's ability to pay, the UA's Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid (OSFA) is now using Institutional Methodology (IM) for select groups of incoming students. Similar to Federal Methodology (FM), which is based on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), IM determines a family's ability to pay for college costs but is more comprehensive, accurate, and current than the FM calculation. The UA bases its IM calculation on the College Board's CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE (PROFILE) for two groups of freshman students.

Who Must Complete the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE

By Invitation only:

  • Students who meet the following criteria will be invited to complete the PROFILE to determine Arizona Assurance eligibility:

o    Arizona Resident

o    Family income (wages or adjusted gross income) of $42,400 or below and be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant

o    Unweighted cumulative high school GPA of 3.0 or higher (on a 4.0 scale)*

o    Submit an application for admission and all required supporting materials to UA by March 1st

o    Complete the FAFSA by March 1st (UA code is 001083)

o    Dependent student

o    Enroll full-time at the UA directly after high school

  • Students who meet the following criteria will be invited to complete the PROFILE to determine eligibility for institutional grant funds:

o    Non-Resident students

o    First time, full-time freshmen

o    Submit an application for admission and all required supporting materials to the University of Arizona by March 1st

o    Complete the FAFSA by March 1st

o    FAFSA EFC ≤ $25,000

Students are notified by invitation only if they must complete the PROFILE. Students should complete the PROFILE only if OSFA has requested that they do so. If OSFA has not requested that the student complete the PROFILE, the completion of this application will be of no benefit to the student.

Students will be notified of the invitation to complete the PROFILE via:

  • Their Next Steps Center
  • Their UAccess Student Center To Do List
  • UA Email

If the parents of the student are divorced/separated/never married or are living separately, the noncustodial parent must complete the Noncustodial PROFILE (NCP). Students who are unable to complete the NCP may submit a Request for Waiver of Noncustodial PROFILE. Students should speak with their Financial Aid Counselor if they feel they qualify to submit this request.

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the Wrong College Major will cost you, Big time!

November 10, 2011
The wrong college major will cost you big time in future pay and employment stabliity. Will your (or your student’s) college major pay and more importantly will the college major lead to a job? I came across a recent article on Yahoo News that led me to the Wall Street Journal. The WSJ article “From […]

The wrong college major will cost you big time in future pay and employment stabliity.

Will your (or your student’s) college major pay and more importantly will the college major lead to a job?

I came across a recent article on Yahoo News that led me to the Wall Street Journal.

The WSJ article “From College Major to Career” states the following:

Choosing the right college major can make a big difference in students' career prospects, in terms of employment and pay. Here’s a look at how various college majors fare in the job market, based on 2010 Census data. Some popular majors, such as nursing and finance, do particularly well, with unemployment under 5% and high salaries during the course of their careers.

There are certain majors that simply perpetuate themselves. For example, the only job that I can think of for a Philosophy major graduate is to teach philosophy. It’s the circle of life, study philosophy, graduate, teach others philosophy. Being a college professor is not a bad thing, IF that is what you want to do. (If you can think of another job with philosophy major please let me know. Maybe write a book, but that would still fall under the category of teach…)

Check out this link http://graphicsweb.wsj.com/documents/NILF1111/#term= for employment rates AND friend me on Facebook JD Joseph Wyczalek for more tips, and time lines.

While money is not everything, but neither is being broke and not being able to buy food or afford shelter. Take the time to
investigate majors, now, while still in high school. You will be miles ahead of the average student.

Need help with selecting the “right” major. We can help.

 

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$275,000 dollar nightmare

November 3, 2011
“You should have known, you should have read the fine print” these words are uttered in back rooms when they should be out in the open. Recently reported on CNN, a young man who did not understand the ramifications of taking out excessive student loan debt just to attend and graduate from a so called […]

“You should have known, you should have read the fine print” these words are uttered in back rooms when they should be out in the open.

Recently reported on CNN, a young man who did not understand the ramifications of taking out excessive student loan debt just to attend and graduate from a so called brand name university. “I’ll just deal with it later” says student Ryan Durosky.

Who is at fault here, is it the student who racked up over a quarter million dollars in student debt or is the fault on the University for allowing this to happen. Are universities cold heartless money grubbing machines interested in one thing only, the bottom line?

 

http://cnn.com/video/?/video/us/2010/05/25/am.cho.college.costs.part.2.cnn

As college costs continue to skyrocket, we will see more and more stories like the one in this video.

This does not have to happen, if you choose the right college.

One of the biggest mistakes both parents and students make is not starting the college preparation process soon enough. Earlier is always better, 9th or even 8th grade is not too early to start.

You can graduate with no student loan debt, but you must take action now.

The cure is simple. Prepare Position and Package Students for College Success.

Prepare. We help prepare students for college success by helping them understand what is to be expected and help them avoid some of the major hazards.

Position: Through our proprietary College Touch Points procedures, we help students get on the college’s radar so that colleges are more eager to recruit the student and entice the student with scholarships. Positioning also includes, review of parental assets to minimize exposure and capitalize on the most aid available.

Package: Just like a good advertising company that helps develop a hot new brand, your student is properly marketed to appropriate colleges increasing the chance of admission and increasing scholarship and grant eligibility. Parental assets are properly packaged to maximize aid.

 

 

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503 error on AZCollegePlanning

September 26, 2011
503: Service Temporarily Unavailable Too many IP addresses accessing one secure area! Please contact Support if you need assistance. If you are receiving a 503 error when attempting to log into AZCollegePlanning.com please contact us for help concerning access to this website. Please include the email address associated with the account and the user name, when sending […]

503: Service Temporarily Unavailable
Too many IP addresses accessing one secure area!
Please contact Support if you need assistance.

  • If you are receiving a 503 error when attempting to log into AZCollegePlanning.com please contact us for help concerning access to this website.

Please include the email address associated with the account and the user name, when sending a request.

thank you,

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Phoenix College Fair 2011

September 22, 2011
Imagine filling out 227 forms. I’ve got writers cramps just thinking about it. At the upcoming Phoenix College Fair, 227 schools will be represented. Working on your “College Touch Points” is now easier than ever. It used to be that when a student went to a college fair they would take 5 minutes or more […]

Imagine filling out 227 forms. I’ve got writers cramps just thinking about it. At the upcoming Phoenix College Fair, 227 schools will be represented.

Working on your “College Touch Points” is now easier than ever. It used to be that when a student went to a college fair they would take 5 minutes or more filling out forms for each college they were interested in. Now a quick scan from a prefilled out form handles all of it electronically.

No need to fill out all the registration cards for dozens of colleges by hand!

New streamlining procedures are now available. Watch the 3 minute video and register on the link below.

Sunday, October 2nd

11:00am to 3:00pm

While the College Fair is free to attend, NACAC is encouraging all students to pre-register  online.   After registering, you will have access to a
bar-coded page, please print this page and take it to the fair. Each college  and university attending the fair will have a scanner that will retrieve your  information when the barcode is scanned.

Pre-registration is available online at the  following link:

https://www.gotomyncf.com/

Phoenix Convention Center
West Hall 1-2
100 N Third Street
Phoenix, AZ 85004

Fair Hours: Sunday, October 2, 2011 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Colleges represented
Academy of Art
University
Adams State College
American University
Arizona Christian
University
Arizona State
University
Army ROTC
Augustana College
Baylor University
Bethany Lutheran
College
Boise State University
Boston University
Bradley University
Brandeis University
Bryant University
California Lutheran
University
California Polytechnic
State University
California State
University-Fresno
Carroll College
Chapman University
Clark Atlanta
University
Coe College
Colby College
College for Creative
Studies
College of Charleston
Colorado Christian
University
Colorado School of
Mines
Colorado State
University
Colorado State
University-Pueblo
Columbia College
Columbia College
Chicago
Columbia College
Hollywood
Columbus College of
Art and Design
Concordia University
Concordia
University-Irvine
Cornell College
Cornish College of the
Arts
Creighton University
Defiance College
DePauw University
DeVry University
DigiPen Institute of
Technology
Dixie State College of
Utah
Dominican University
of California
Drake University
Drew University
Drexel University
The Art Institute of
New York City
Brown Mackie College
Embry-Riddle
Aeronautical University
FIDM-The Fashion
Institute of Design & Merchandising
Florida Institute of
Technology
Fort Hays State
University
Fort Lewis College
Fresno Pacific
University
George Mason
University
George Washington
University
Gonzaga University
Grand Canyon
University
Grinnell College
Grove City College
Hampshire College
Hampton University
Harvey Mudd College
Hastings College
Hawaii Pacific
University
Hendrix College
High Point University
Hillsdale College
Hofstra University
Hope College
Hope International
University
Humboldt State
University
Idaho State University
Illinois Wesleyan
University
John Cabot University
Johnson & Wales
University
Johnson C. Smith
University
Knox College
Lafayette College
Lake Forest College
Laureate Hospitality
Education (LHE)
Lewis & Clark
College
LIM College - Where
Business Meets Fashion
Loras College
Loyola University
Chicago
Loyola University New
Orleans
Macalester College
Manhattanville College
Maricopa Community
Colleges
Marquette University
Menlo College
Mesa State College
Mitchell College
Mount Holyoke College
Mount St. Mary's
College
Musicians Institute
New Mexico Institute
of Mining and Technology
New Mexico Military
Institute
New Mexico State
University
New School of
Architecture & Design
New York Institute of
Technology
North Carolina State
University
North Park University
Northeastern
University
Northern Arizona
University
Northwest University
Norwich University
Oklahoma City
University
Oregon Institute of
Technology
Oregon State
University
Pace
University-Pleasantville Westchester
Pacific Lutheran
University
Pacific Northwest
College of Art
Pacific University
Penn State University
Pepperdine University
Pomona College
Portland State
University
Prescott College
Purdue University
Quest University
Canada
Regis University
Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute
Rhodes College
Rochester Institute of
Technology
Rocky Mountain College
Rutgers, The State
University of New Jersey
Saint John's
University
Saint Louis University
Saint Martin's
University
Saint Mary's College
of California
San Diego State
University
Santa Barbara City
College
Santa Clara University
Santa Fe University of
Art and Design
Santa Monica College
Savannah College of
Art and Design
Seattle Pacific
University
Seattle University
Seton Hall University
Sierra Nevada College
Simpson College
Soka University of
America
South Dakota School of
Mines and Technology
Southern Methodist
University
Southern Utah
University
St. Edward's
University
St. Louis College of
Pharmacy
St. Mary's University
Stevens Institute of
Technology
Swarthmore College
Syracuse University
Texas Christian
University
Texas State
University-San Marcos
Texas Tech University
The Catholic
University of America
The Evergreen State
College
The Ohio State
University
The University of
Alabama
The University of
Arizona
The University of
British Columbia - Vancouver
The University of
Montana Western
The University of New
Mexico
The University of the
Arts
Trinity University
Tulane University
UCLA School of Arts
& Architecture
United States Merchant
Marine Academy
Universal Technical
Institute
University of
Advancing Technology
University of Alaska
Anchorage
University of Calgary
University of
California-Davis
University of
California-San Diego
University of
California-Santa Barbara
University of Colorado
at Boulder
University of Colorado
at Colorado Springs
University of Colorado
Denver
University of
Connecticut
University of Denver
University of
Evansville
University of Hawaii
at Manoa
University of Iowa
University of Maryland
University of Miami
University of
Nebraska-Lincoln
University of
Nevada-Las Vegas
University of Northern
Colorado
University of Oregon
University of
Pittsburgh
University of Portland
University of Puget
Sound
University of Redlands
University of
Rochester
University of San
Diego
University of San
Francisco
University of
Saskatchewan
University of Southern
California
University of the
Pacific
University of
Washington
University of
Wisconsin-Madison
University of Wyoming
US Air Force ROTC
Utah State University
Utah Valley University
Vanderbilt University
Vanguard University of
Southern California
Villanova University
Virginia Military
Institute
Warner Pacific College
Wartburg College
Washington State
University
Washington University
in St. Louis
Weber State University
Webster University
Wentworth Institute of
Technology
Wentworth Military
Academy & Junior College
Western State College
of Colorado
Western Washington
University
Westminster College
Whitman College
Whittier College
Whitworth University
William Woods
University
Woodbury University
Xavier University
Yavapai College

 

 

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